The Mantis Quad Track Uses Breakthrough Technology to Elevate the Tracked Vehicle Game

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The Mantis Personal Tracked Vehicle is a step up in the world of personally tracked vehicles. Where tracked vehicles have taken the lead in moving over varied terrain, the Mantis Personal Tracked Vehicle features something new. It might look like some relative of the Mars Rover, but it is fully terrestrial for Earth. What makes this tracked vehicle different is the four-wheel independent tracks that pivot. It is a game changer because currently tracked personal vehicles use inline tracks that tilt the vehicle if one side encounters an obstacle. The four-wheel independent suspension keeps the vehicle in a more level plain allowing greater stability and more ability to cross great varieties of terrain.

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After all, if you want to succeed in one of the most inhospitable places imaginable, head to Mars. Where does the idea to change the world come from? It has to come, at least in part, from the awesome toys that build the imagination. When I was growing up, we had these outstanding model rockets that you could launch using a firework type of propulsion. They are probably outlawed now, but those were the kind of toys that fueled the imagination.

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The Mantis Quad Track

While the Mantis Tracked Vehicle has the look of the Curiosity Rover, it is fully functional. The special design includes a customized transmission. One of the better features is the fact that this tracked vehicle has a zero pivot option what allows the vehicle to turn around without the need to make a multi-point turn in tight quarters. One major problem with this vehicle is the low frame support that limits the height, somewhat, of that you can actually drive over. Durability is added into the project through an air-bag suspension that takes a lot of the rough bounce out of traveling over bumpy terrain. The wider platform offers more stability on many surfaces, but may hinder the performance of the vehicle in narrow corridors.

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