Logging Boat Captain Unloads Timber Ship the Canadian Way

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Unloading a ship full of timber typically takes a long time because you can only hoist so much lumber off with each load. But those clever Canadians have found a way to bypass this time-consuming process. Instead of using a crane to slowly take stacks of lumber off the ship, they simply tip the ship over and the lumber comes sliding out! It looks dangerous, and you may wonder if this is some sort of accident at first glance. After all, it looks like the ship is about to sink–but what happens with this Seaspan Survivor barge after that is pretty amazing.

Logging Boat Captain Unloads Timber Ship the Canadian Way

The Logging Industry in Canada

You can see that there is a heck of a lot of lumber on this ship, and it was likely taken from the forest-rich province of British Columbia. Along with Quebec and Ontario, B.C. is where most forestry in Canada occurs. This country is ideal for forestry because it’s estimated that about 42% of it is forests containing mostly pine, spruce, and poplar trees. When you consider how many trees they have, it’s not surprising that forestry in Canada is a $20 billion a year industry.

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It May Look Like a Regular Ship, but It Isn’t!

You’ll see that though it may look like a regular ship, the vessel dumping this timber is actually a big barge. Barges have been around for hundreds of years, and there are several different kinds used for various tasks. The barge we are looking at here, though, is a log barge, and a specially designed one at that. Believe it or not, it’s actually designed to tip over to unload its cargo. An article from The Nauticapedia sheds more light on how these barges are designed and how they evolved over the years. Basically, it took a lot of trial and error to get it right.

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